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Egg prices soar due to bird flu

Published: Apr. 4, 2022 at 7:32 PM CDT
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BISMARCK, N.D. (KFYR) - The latest item in the grocery store to go up in price: eggs!

The price of a carton of eggs is increasing because of avian influenza — also known as bird flu.

North Dakota is one of 21 states with confirmed cases of avian influenza, which is an airborne disease that infects both commercial and backyard poultry, limiting egg supply.

The cost of a dozen eggs nationally hit $2.88 which is up 52% since the first confirmed case of bird flu in February.

While no humans have tested positive for the disease, it has killed more than 17 million birds across the country according to the USDA.

“If they get influenza, most times they die rather quickly, so it affects them very badly. Mortality can be very high and before that would ever be to happen, the state and federal governments would step in and euthanize the flock,” said David Rude, vice president of the North Dakota Turkey Federation

Here in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health has canceled all shows, public sales, swaps and exhibitions of poultry and other birds.

“If I were to get influenza in my farm, I basically would be done for the year of raising turkeys because you have to go through a process. All the birds are euthanized, probably bury all the litter in the barn. It has to be composted to a certain temperature and then remixed again,” said Rude.

Then the farm has to be tested and retested which could take weeks.

“Protecting our North Dakota producers, who raise approximately 1 million commercial birds yearly, and our many backyard bird owners is high priority,” said North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring.

With rising cases of bird flu, properly cooked poultry is safe to eat according to the World Health Organization.

Also, the CDC says there is no evidence that shows the virus can be transmitted from poultry to humans if cooked properly.

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