The reality of miscarriage

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Starting a family is a dream for many couples, but the March of Dimes estimates half of all pregnancies end in miscarriage.

Last night we discussed the shockingly high rate of women who go through miscarriage. Tonight, we're talking with women who are breaking the silence on their own personal struggles with pregnancy loss.

Jamel Wald has always wanted a large family, but, after her two miscarriages, she started to lose hope.

"It was very frustrating. And I did feel like it was all my fault, that there was something wrong with me and for the longest time I felt broken," said Wald, a victim of miscarriage.

Tara Brandner has also struggled with infertility issues and life following her miscarriages.

"It's isolating, it's super isolating. You don't want to share with your friends, you're scared to tell your own family,” said Brandner, also a victim of miscarriage.

The loneliness they felt during their pregnancy losses has motivated them to support other women going through the same.

"I wish I would've had a support group, like I just wish I would've had people in North Dakota to go to," said Brandner.

Now, women have a place to share their experiences in the Everlasting Hope Community Group.

"Just for it to be acknowledged by each individual that what they're going through and what they're feeling is real, and it's valid," said Brandner.

Wald and Brander didn't stop trying and they're able to join in their excitement about life after miscarrying.

"I found out that I was pregnant,” said Wald.

Wald is 29 weeks pregnant and Brandner had her baby boy in 2018.

Miscarriage is common, but its impact should not be underestimated. Many women experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress, depression, and anxiety following their loss.

For resources and support, you can call the Everlasting Hope Group at 701-203-3442.