Soybean storage a concern for some farmers

The U.S. trade dispute with China is creating a domino effect for North Dakota farmers.

With tariffs imposed, the immediate problem for producers is the lack of markets for soybeans.

The NDSU extension agricultural engineer says elevators don't have a market for soybeans. He says they're lowering the price that farmers are getting paid.

And some farmers say they're concerned about the prices but have enough storage. While others say figuring out storage is at the top of their priority list.

Many farmers trying to figure out where they'll store their soybeans.

Some have started building extra bins to hold their beans.

Hazelton farmer Mike Appert said: " I've out up a few bins myself in preparation here just to store the crop. You know we'll probably have some corn piled up on the ground because we'll be short of storage but that's just how I'm gonna deal with it. I plan on just storing and sitting on the bean crop."

Others say they've hauled other products off of their farm for space.

"We've hauled some wheat away. Kind of making room but we've got storage for our beans that we have out there. The number of acres we've got, so it's not much of an issue for us. But for other people it is," said Lance Renner, a Morton County farmer.

But those that focus primarily on soybeans are picking to leave other grains out of bins for space.

"You can pile corn easier. For example it can sit outside all winter and it's easier to manage and keep in condition. Soybeans you don't really want them in an uncovered pile. If it rains, they get wet. That's not gonna be good for soybeans," added Appert.

He says a lot of people are scrambling and shifting gears. He says they're trying to accommodate the soybean crop.

The NDSU agricultural engineer Ken Hellevang says many including himself hope the trade dispute gets solved.

But until then, he says figuring out long term storage is essential.