Enterovirus D68 cases on the rise

This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and...
This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions.
Published: Sep. 18, 2022 at 6:48 PM CDT
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BISMARCK, N.D. (KFYR) - As kids return to school, it’s routine to check on their vaccination status. But what about old viruses that are starting to make a reappearance?

Enterovirus was first identified in California in 1962 and usually becomes active every two years. The population most at risk is young children under the age of three. Adults can contract the virus, but the symptoms are usually mild.

For children, symptoms will present as a common cold but could get worse.

“You might have a cold the first week, but then two, three, four weeks later you might start noticing some weakness in the arms, the legs, you might not be able to move as well,” says Dr. Noe Mateo, infectious disease consultant at Sanford Health.

Dr. Mateo says that while the CDC does not require a report on this virus, he hopes primary care physicians will keep track of infections in order to help identify how widespread this infection is because there is no vaccine for the virus at this time.