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Doctors say they’ve learned what to expect about new strains from other coronaviruses

There are 2,310 people listed as being in Alabama hospitals right now with COVID-19.
There are 2,310 people listed as being in Alabama hospitals right now with COVID-19.(Associated Press)
Published: Feb. 25, 2021 at 2:44 PM CST
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BISMARCK, N.D. (KFYR) - The coronavirus is mutating. While the variant might be new, the phenomenon of new strains isn’t.

Looking back at how other viruses have mutated in the recent past is helpful for doctors and scientists trying to tackle the new COVID-19 variants. Doctors have identified four types of coronaviruses already present around the globe-- causing illnesses such as the common cold. These common coronaviruses mutate every two to three years.

When this happens, the population experiences bouts of cold or illness.

“So, when you have coronaviruses already capable of doing that, you have to think that this current SARS-CoV-2 is going to wind up behaving in a very similar fashion,” said Sanford Health Infectious Disease Consultant Dr. Noe Mateo.

Dr. Noe Mateo says the original strain of COVID-19 was already effective in spreading from person to person.

He says it only began mutating due to pressure from a lack of new hosts and vaccines.

He says this pressure might cause the virus to mutate more regularly.

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