U.S. Army Corps of Engineers grants final easement for DAPL under Lake Oahe

OMAHA, NEB. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has granted the easement to Dakota Access, allowing the Dakota Access Pipeline to be laid under federal lands managed by the Corps at Lake Oahe.

The granting of the easement follows the Secretary of the Army's decision to terminate the Notice of Intent to Perform an Environmental Impact Statement.

“The safety of those located on Corps-managed land remains our top priority, in addition to preventing contaminants from entering the waterway” said U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District Commander, Col. John Henderson. “We appreciate the proactive efforts of the Tribes to help clean the protest site ahead of potential flooding along the river, typical during the runoff season.”

The easement, covers approximately 1.25 miles of the pipeline that runs under the Missouri River along federally owned land.



Sen. John Hoeven released the following statement after the Army Corps' announcement:

“Today, the Army Corps of Engineers granted the final easement required to complete the Dakota Access Pipeline project, which will be equipped with the latest safeguards and technology to protect the Standing Rock Sioux and all people downstream. Also it will make our country stronger and more secure by helping us produce and transport more domestic energy instead of importing it from the Middle East.

“Now, we all need to work together to make sure the project is completed safely and with as little disruption to the community as possible. This has been a very difficult issue for everyone who lives and works in the area. We have called on the Corps, Department of Interior, Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security to provide additional federal law enforcement resources to support state and local law enforcement. Also, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council has asked the protesters to leave the campsite on Corps land and Chairman Archambault has appealed to people to act peacefully.

“Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement officers are already on site at our request to assist state and local law enforcement. We continue to work with the Corps and Customs and Border Protection officials to secure additional federal law enforcement personnel and resources to help keep the peace during the final leg of construction.

“Going forward, we are committed to reviewing the permitting process to ensure that everyone has an opportunity to be heard and that a fair, certain, and legal process has been followed when approving new infrastructure. We all need to work together to ensure people and communities rebuild trust and peacefully resolve their differences.”



Rep. Kevin Cramer said:

"I am pleased the Corps decided not to prolong this process any further and issued the easement quickly, while still complying with the letter and spirit of the law to give advance notice to Congress. A new and better signal has been sent by the Trump Administration on infrastructure development in this country. I know with the oversight of landowners and the North Dakota Public Service Commission, the company will properly restore the land it has disturbed and the PSC, cooperating with U.S. Department of Transportation, will work with the company to ensure the safe operation of the pipeline as it delivers this American product to market for many decades."



Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said:

Today's decision from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a step toward the closure necessary for pipeline construction. If protestors continue to take unlawful actions in response to the Corps’ decision, law enforcement will be forced to continue to put themselves in harm’s way to enforce the rule of law. Our hope is that the new administration in Washington will now provide North Dakota law enforcement the necessary resources to bring closure to the protests. This has never been about the pipeline or the protests. This has always been about the rule of law, protecting both residents and peaceful protestors from criminal elements that have significantly harmed people and property – all with very little assistance from the federal government in the last administration.



Morton County Commissioner Cody Schulz said:

Today's decision from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a step toward the closure necessary for pipeline construction. If protestors continue to take unlawful actions in response to the Corps’ decision, law enforcement will be forced to continue to put themselves in harm’s way to enforce the rule of law. Our hope is that the new administration in Washington will now provide North Dakota law enforcement the necessary resources to bring closure to the protests. This has never been about the pipeline or the protests. This has always been about the rule of law, protecting both residents and peaceful protestors from criminal elements that have significantly harmed people and property – all with very little assistance from the federal government in the last administration.



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