Federal Government grants $5 million for crime fighting in Indian Country

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BISMARCK, N.D. - The federal government announced that tribal governments in North Dakota will receive 10 grants totaling about $5 million.

The grants will go toward making sure victims, families and their communities have better response and recovery times.

They will also try to help reduce violence against women and make sure law enforcement have the resources they need to do their jobs.

"Where it's good news, it's still inadequate to deal with the kinds of challenges that we have in Indian Country but we look forward to continuing with DOJ to try to get the resources that they need," said Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D.

According to Heitkamp's office, the money will be dispersed as follows:

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians:

· $876,182 in federal funding to Indian tribal governments authorized under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to support tribal governments in decreasing the violence Native American women face, strengthen tribal government’s ability to quickly respond, and make sure those who commit such crimes are held accountable.

· $753,801 in federal funding under the Tribal Justice System Infrastructure Program that will improve facilities at the Turtle Mountain adult detention center by installing a new camera system, replacing the heating and cooling system, and installing a perimeter fence to increase safety.

· $718,657 in federal funding from the Public Safety and Community Policing Grant Program for hiring and training law enforcement as well as making sure they have the equipment they need to do their jobs.

· $403,478 in federal funding made available through the Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities Program that will assist the community in improving investigations, prosecution, and promoting trauma-informed and culturally appropriate practices in managing child abuse cases.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe:

· $816,260 in federal funding to Indian tribal governments authorized under VAWA to support tribal governments in reducing the violence Native American women face, strengthen the tribal government’s ability to respond quicker, and make sure those who commit such crimes are held accountable.

· $311,034 in federal funding made available under the Tribal Juvenile Healing and Wellness Courts program to build a center that will work with the juvenile court system to help young people ages 12 through 21 address substance abuse challenges and put them on a better path forward.

· $266,254 in federal funding from the Public Safety and Community Policing Grant Program to support training law enforcement as well as making sure they have the equipment they need to do their jobs.

· $74,981 in federal funding under the Comprehensive Tribal Justice Systems Strategic Planning Program to support planning efforts that improve tribal justice and community safety.

Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation:

· $449,994 in federal funding under the Comprehensive Victim Assistance Program to support victim assistance that provides better collaboration in response to crime, and improves trauma-informed and culturally appropriate practices that will help victims, their families, and the community recover.

Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe:

· $345,300 in federal funding made available under the Tribal Youth Program to improve the Spirit Lake Sunka Wakan Ah-Ku (Bringing Back the Horses) Program which aims to prevent repeat criminal offenses from juveniles by promoting the work of Native youth with horses in a culturally appropriate manner to help put them on the right track forward.