Nicole DesRosier

KMOT News Director

Connect With Me

nicole.desrosier@kmot.com

701-852-4101 ext.135

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I'm originally from Big Sandy, Montana. While attending Minot State University, I started at KMOT as a camera operator. After that I ended up doing a little bit of everything behind the scenes from directing to producing commercials.

I eventually transferred to KFYR-TV in Bismarck and had an opportunity to do an internship as a producer to complete my Broadcasting Degree. A few years later, I became the Executive Producer, and that role led to my most significant career experience so far: producing non-stop and helping lead a newsroom during the flood of 2011.

That was truly the worst and best of times, and being able to report how many people were displaced but not in need of the Red Cross Shelter was a testament to how great this community really is. I love that I've been able to move back to Minot as KMOT's News Director. This city has always felt like home, and I'm glad it is again.

When I'm not working, I'm updating my house, transforming a piece of furniture, or planting something in my yard.


Most Popular

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